June 25, 2018

 Permanent link

New COPS Grants Are Available

Under the STOP School Violence Act, Congress authorized $25 million to be provided to districts and local law enforcement agencies to prevent school violence. While districts are not eligible as the primary application under this program any school district interested in the program is encouraged to partner with their State, unit of local government to submit an application for funding. The funding can be used for:

  • Coordination with law enforcement
  • Training for local law enforcement officers to prevent student violence against others and self
  • Metal detectors, locks, lighting, and other deterrent measures
  • Technology for expedited notification of local law enforcement during an emergency
  • Any other measure that the COPS Office determines may provide a significant improvement in security

 The deadline is July 30, 2018 to apply. All the details are available here: https://cops.usdoj.gov/default.asp?Item=2958 

June 25, 2018

(PERKINS) Permanent link

AASA Responds to Senate Rewrite

This is the letter AASA sent to the Senate HELP committee in advance of their mark up. 

On behalf of AASA, The School Superintendents Association, representing 13,000 public school superintendents across the country, I write to express our deep concerns with the Senate version of the Strengthening Career and Technical Education for the Twenty First Century Act. We urge the Committee to postpone the vote tomorrow and continue to work with stakeholders who implement Perkins CTE programs to ensure widespread support of the bill from the K-12 education community. 

We were incredibly pleased with the strong, bipartisan Perkins CTE reauthorization bill that moved through the House in 2016 and again in 2017. Comparing the bills in both chambers, we find the Senate bill contains prescriptive accountability that walks back the flexibility granted in ESSA. Specifically, the threat of losing district resources for failure to meet achievement targets and the requirement that districts demonstrate meaningful progress in meeting performance measures are policies we are surprised to see maintained in this reauthorization. The inclusion of these policies is made even more surprising given that districts have less time—two years instead of three years—to demonstrate they are reaching state performance targets before a state can sanction them.  

Unlike the bipartisan House bill, the Senate has chosen to maintain the continuous improvement language in Perkins. The idea that district CTE programs can annually improve on all accountability metrics regardless of economic circumstances, demographic shifts, and federal and state funding dynamics is disconnected from what we know about the reality of running successful Perkins programs.  Whether a district was a high-flyer or a lower-performer, this metric continues to lead to unintended consequences at the local level. We believe that districts should be encouraged to focus on meaningful program quality enhancements rather than hitting new performance targets every year and encourage the Senate to adopt the same language as the House.  

Aside from these missteps, we are pleased the Senate chose to mirror the House bill by requiring that school superintendents, teachers, workforce development boards and other key stakeholders provide input on new performance targets that are set exclusively by the State. We are also grateful that the Senate chose to include the local application model in the House bill that will ameliorate the paperwork burden of Perkins by allowing districts to fill out a more streamlined local plan although we are disappointed that the local application is twice as long as the version that passed the House.    

Like the House bill the Senate bill emphasizes district engagement with both higher education and business/industry partners to confirm CTE program quality. Districts would conduct a biennial needs assessment that provides business/industry and higher education partners, as well as other key  stakeholders, an opportunity to provide input into the local plan to ensure the district is directing its limited resources towards relevant, well-aligned programs of study. In addition, the Senate bill also ensures districts have access to, and take into consideration, critical labor market information that will detail current, intermediate, or long-term labor market projections when determining whether to maintain, develop or eliminate programs of study.  

Finally, we would be remiss if we did not express our enthusiasm for the one meaningful way that the Senate bill improves upon the House bill: it creates a definition for CTE concentrator that is uniform across states and districts and ensures that districts programs reflect the achievement of students who are truly engaged in their CTE programs.  

AASA hopes that the House and Senate will work together to find a compromise that strikes an appropriate balance of holding districts accountable for limited federal resources and ensuring that districts are incentivized to address program improvement in a meaningful and realistic way.   

June 21, 2018

(ADVOCACY TOOLS, GUEST BLOGS, ED FUNDING) Permanent link

Guest Blog Post: States and Local Governments Win Online Sales Tax Case

Note from Noelle: Today, the Supreme Court issued--by a 5-4 margin--a vote in favor of the position of our filed amicus brief, supporting the rights of states to collect tax on internet sales. Lisa penned this blog as a summary of the case and proceeding.

This guest blog comes from Lisa Soronen, Executive Director of the State and Local Legal Center. Lisa's group coordinated the amicus brief AASA signed on to in the South Dakota v Wayfair case before the Supreme Court, related to how states can collect taxes on internet sales.

In South Dakota v. Wayfair the Supreme Court ruled that states and local governments can require vendors with no physical presence in the state to collect sales tax. According to the Court, in a 5-4 decision, “economic and virtual contacts” are enough to create a “substantial nexus” with the state allowing the state to require collection.  

In 1967 in National Bellas Hess  v. Department of Revenue of Illinois, the Supreme Court held that per its Commerce Clause jurisprudence, states and local governments cannot require businesses to collect sales tax unless the business has a physical presence in the state.

Twenty-five years later in Quill v. North Dakota (1992), the Supreme Court reaffirmed the physical presence requirement but admitted that “contemporary Commerce Clause jurisprudence might not dictate the same result” as the Court had reached in Bellas Hess.

Customers buying from remote sellers still owe sale tax but they rarely pay it when the remote seller does not collect it. Congress had the authority to overrule Bellas Hess and Quill but never did so. 

In March 2015 Justice Kennedy wrote a concurring opinion stating that the “legal system should find an appropriate case for this Court to reexamine Quill.” Justice Kennedy criticized Quill in Direct Marketing Association v. Brohl for many of the same reasons the State and Local Legal Center (SLLC) stated in its amicus brief in that case. Specifically, internet sales have risen astronomically since 1992 and states and local governments are unable to collect most taxes due on sales from out-of-state vendors. 

Following the 2015 Kennedy opinion a number of state legislatures passed laws requiring remote vendors to collect sales tax in order to challenge Quill. South Dakota’s law was the first ready for Supreme Court review. It requires out-of-state retailers to collect sales tax if they annually conduct $100,000 worth of business or 200 separate transactions in South Dakota.

In an opinion written by Justice Kennedy the Court offered three reasons for why it was abandoning the physical presence rule. “First, the physical presence rule is not a necessary interpretation of the requirement that a state tax must be ‘applied to an activity with a substantial nexus with the taxing State.’ Second, Quill creates rather than resolves market distortions. And third, Quill imposes the sort of arbitrary, formalistic distinction that the Court’s modern Commerce Clause precedents disavow.” 

While the dissenting Justices, in an opinion written by Chief Justice Roberts, would have left it to Congress to act, Justice Kennedy opined the Court should be “vigilant” in correcting its error. “Courts have acted as the front line of review in this limited sphere; and hence it is important that their principles be accurate and logical, whether or not Congress can or will act in response.”   

To require a vendor to collect sales tax the vendor must still have a “substantial nexus” with the state. The Court found a “substantial nexus” in this case based on the “economic and virtual contacts” Wayfair has with the state. A business could not do $100,000 worth of business or 200 separate transactions in South Dakota “unless the seller availed itself of the substantial privilege of carrying on business in South Dakota.” 

Finally, the Court acknowledged that questions remain whether “some other principle in the Court’s Commerce Clause doctrine might invalidate the Act.” But the Court cited to three features of South Dakota’s tax system that “appear designed to prevent discrimination against or undue burdens upon interstate commerce. First, the Act applies a safe harbor to those who transact only limited business in South Dakota. Second, the Act ensures that no obligation to remit the sales tax may be applied retroactively. Third, South Dakota is one of more than 20 States that have adopted the Streamlined Sales and Use Tax Agreement.”

Tillman Breckenridge, Bailey Glasser, and Patricia Roberts, William & Mary Law School Appellate and Supreme Court Clinic, wrote the SLLC amicus brief which the following organizations joined: the National Governors Association, the National Conference of State Legislatures, the Council of State Governments, the National Association of Counties, the National League of Cities, the United States Conference of Mayors, the International City/County Management Association, the International Municipal Lawyers Association, the Government Finance Officers Association, National Public Labor Relations Association, the International Public Management Association for Human Resources, National State Treasurers Association, National School Boards Association, AASA, the School Superintendents Association, the National Association of Elementary School Principals, and the Association of School Business Officials International. 

June 18. 2018

(WELL-BEING) Permanent link

AASA Statement on Family Separation

AASA Executive Director Daniel A. Domenech and AASA officers Gail Pletnick (Dysart Unified, AZ); Chris Gaines (Mehlville, MO) and Deb Kerr (Brown Deer Schools, WI) issued the following statement in response to the recent separation of children and parents at the border: 

"Our nation’s public school superintendents and the schools they serve are legally required to educate the children that come through their doors. We are deeply concerned with recent steps that result in the separation of children and parents at the border. Immigration policy is not easy, but we are deeply troubled by the purposeful and aggressive implementation of a policy that is widely recognized as flawed, one that separates young children from their parents in a world they do not know. AASA is an organization that serves and represents education professionals. And while we won’t claim expertise in immigration policy, the nation’s public school superintendents are experts in what can and does work for students and young children, and we know that the separation policy is harmful, traumatic, and stressful, and these effects may follow these children for the rest of their lives. Policy can be tough and fair without being inhumane, and we urge the administration to immediately cease this intentionally cruel policy.”

 

June 18, 2018(1)

(ESEA, RESEARCH, PUBLICATIONS AND TOOLKITS, ED FUNDING) Permanent link

Bringing ESSA Title IVA to Life: How School Districts Are Spending Title IV Dollars

AASA, The School Superintendents Association partnered with the National Association of Federal Education Program Administrators (NAFEPA) and Whiteboard Advisors to conduct a nation-wide survey of school districts to see how and where school systems are investing critical ESSA Title IV Part A funds. 

Title IV of ESSA, the Student Support and Academic Enrichment (SSAE) program, is a flexible funding block grant focused on the work of ensuring students and schools have access to the programs that support safe and healthy students, provide well-rounded education, and expand the use of technology in schools. Between NCLB and ESSA, Title IV transformed from a collection of small, stand-alone siloed programs that had been all but zeroed out (ultimately totaling less than $300 million) into a flexible funding block grant, allocated via formula to states and available to all schools, authorized at $1.6 billion. 

The program has broad support from education leaders and practitioners and is perhaps best captured in this elevator pitch submitted in response to this survey: 

No two schools are the same. Our need is not your need, but both needs are relevant to each specific demographic and climate. Increased flexibility increases the likelihood of spending with efficacy. I know you don't always trust me to do the best thing for my kids (although I am confused as to why), but proximity to the need is important to weeding out appropriate supports and solutions. I appreciate your support of my school, and I understand your desire to earmark some funds for specific needs that we share nationally, but I need some spending flexibility if I am to always match support to the need.

Relatively simple in design, ESSA Title IV allocates flexible block grant funding to each state based on the ESSA Title I funding formula, which targets federal funding based on need, where schools and states with a higher share of students in poverty receive greater funding. Funding flows from the federal to the state and the state to the local level in amounts that are proportional to the distribution of Title I funds. Any school district receiving more than $30,000 is required to conduct a needs assessment and submit an application to its state educational agency describing how the district will spend not less than 20 percent of its grant on safe/healthy school initiatives, not less than 20 percent on well-rounded education, and at least a portion on the effective use of technology, with a 15 percent cap on the section’s funding for purchasing “technology infrastructure” (as defined in the law). 

More than 620 school leaders responded to the survey in late May and early June, and you can read the preliminary results here.  

 

June 18, 2018

(RESEARCH, PUBLICATIONS AND TOOLKITS, GUEST BLOGS) Permanent link

Guest Blog: School Safety & Door Barricades Guide

This guest blog comes from Robert Boyd, Executive Director of the Secure Schools Alliance. The alliance has created a quick reference guide, available for AASA members, with information and things to consider when it comes to classroom barricades. 

Physical security is a priority for school administrators and facility managers, to help ensure the safety of students, staff members, and visitors during an active shooter/hostile event.  While evaluating methods of securing doors to prevent access, it’s crucial to consider other hazards and the need for free egress, fire protection, and accessibility, as well as the possibility of unauthorized lockdown.

There are many available options for locking classroom doors, but not all security devices comply with the national life safety codes and the Americans With Disabilities Act.  Some may impede evacuation, affect the performance of fire door assemblies, or be difficult or impossible for someone with a disability to operate.  In school shootings that have occurred, the ability to evacuate immediately has proven critical to reducing casualties.  

Barricading doors with furniture or other items can be used as a last resort to deter access during a lockdown, but classroom barricade devices may introduce other risks and liabilities.  In addition to the life safety and accessibility concerns, these devices could be used by an unauthorized person to secure a room and prevent access by school staff and emergency responders.  Doors have been barricaded during several past school shootings, as well as other hostage-taking incidents and assaults in schools.    

The Secure Schools Alliance has published a document which outlines important considerations related to the use of classroom barricade devices; additional guidance and links to school security resources are also included.  This information will help school administrators choose classroom security methods that maintain life safety and accessibility, as well as limiting unauthorized access.

 

June 12, 2018(1)

 Permanent link

Call to Action: Urge your Rep to oppose PROSPER Act

The House will be counting votes tonight (June 12) to decide whether to consider the reauthorization of the Higher Education Act through their bill, the PROSPER Act. This bill would significantly increase the teacher shortage issue I know many of you are facing by eliminating all teacher preparation elements of HEA and all student loan forgiveness programs currently exercised by teachers in public schools. Please take two minutes to contact your Representative using our legislative action center here:  http://www.congressweb.com/AASA/88. The message will auto-populate, but is open for your edits to put personal touches where applicable. It would be great to get as many messages in today, to stop the momentum and hopefully kill this terrible bill before it comes forward.  

June 12, 2018

(WELL-BEING, ADVOCACY TOOLS, ED FUNDING) Permanent link

Let's Raise Awareness About Need for Congress to Eliminate Anti-Integration Language in Funding Bills

Earlier this year, AASA sent a letter and joined a broader coalition of organizations in a joint letter to oppose the inclusion of anti-integration language in the federal government's annual funding bills. We continue to hold this concern and urge Congress to make 2019 the year they take a stand against this language, and ensure it is not included in the final appropriations bills.

In our letter we wrote: This "....problematic language bars the use of federal funds to transport students for purposes of racial integration. This prohibition undercuts Congress’ intent in reauthorizing the Magnet School Assistance Program (MSAP), constrains school improvement strategies, and undermines the ability of education innovators to implement new school improvement techniques...When this outdated language plays out in real time, the present day effect is to reduce state and local district ability to flexibly implement the education program that best serves the needs of their students and community. This is in direct conflict with the underlying policy premise of the Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA), that of returning authority and decision making to the state and local level. AASA adopted an organization priority of equity, with a focus on positioning AASA as an equity thought leader in education and providing resources and supports on equity for school system leaders at all levels to help them and their teams succeed. There is no underestimating the importance of supporting diversity in schools, and ensuring this harmful language does not exist in the final FY18 appropriations bill is a small but critical step in reaching this goal."

AASA is pleased to be working with the National Coalition on School Diversity (NCSD) to remove this language. They have a fact sheet that provides a great summary of the issue.

Now is the time to raise awareness about this issue. Help us get this information in front of members of Congress and the general public. Take the time to send a quick email or tweet (let us know if you need the staff's email address) to your members of Congress. We have a handful of members of Congress we are focused on, given their leadership positions. If you are represented by one of the following members of Congress, send them a quick tweet; we've listed a sampling below. 

 

  • NC: Rep. Virginia Foxx - @virginiafoxx
  • OK: Rep. Tom Cole - @TomColeOK04
  • CT: Rep. Rosa DeLauro - @rosadelauro
  • WA: Sen. Patty Murray - @PattyMurray
  • TN: Sen. Lamar Alexander - @SenAlexander
  • MO: Sen. Roy Blunt - @RoyBlunt 

 

 Hashtags: #strike301and302 #itstime #DiversityMatters 

Sample tweets:

 

  • Tell Congress #itstime to stop blocking school integration and to #strike301and302 from FY2019 appropriations bills. Call your lawmakers this week! Find contact info at: http://goo.gl/Rmb9ff​ (Senate) and ​http://goo.gl/QY9CtQ​ (House).  
  • Anti-integration provisions from the 1970s are unnecessary roadblocks to school integration. Tell Congress #itstime to #strike301and302 in FY2019. Call your lawmakers this week! Find contact info at: ​http://goo.gl/Rmb9ff​ (Senate) and ​http://goo.gl/QY9CtQ (House).  
  • At a time when racist rhetoric is front & center, we need integrated schools more than ever. Research shows they help reduce racial prejudice & stereotypes. Call your lawmakers and tell them #itstime to #strike301and302 anti-integration riders. Learn more: ​http://goo.gl/vT52Kn  
  • Join our campaign to​ ​#strike301and302​ anti-integration riders from federal appropriations bills. Call your legislators this week and tell them why *you* think​ ​#itstime to remove this barrier to more integrated schools. ​Find a helpful fact sheet at http://goo.gl/Pt3oDa​.  
  • Dozens of organizations agree #itstime to #strike301and302 anti-integration riders. Do you? Let’s get this outdated language removed from federal appropriations bills! Call your lawmakers THIS WEEK to support its removal. Find a helpful fact sheet at http://goo.gl/Pt3oDa​. 
  • See our letter telling Congress #itstime to remove anti-integration riders from federal appropriations ​http://goo.gl/Dka9sb​ & then call your lawmakers THIS WEEK to support this effort. Find contact info at: ​http://goo.gl/Rmb9ff​ (Senate) & ​http://goo.gl/QY9CtQ (House). 
  • Diverse, dynamic societies need diverse, dynamic schools. Tell Congress #itstime to empower local communities to desegregate their schools. Call your lawmakers this week! Find contact info at: ​http://goo.gl/Rmb9ff​ (Senate) and ​http://goo.gl/QY9CtQ (House). #strike301and302 
  • School segregation hurts our children and communities. Tell Congress #itstime to empower local communities to desegregate their schools. Call your lawmakers this week! Find contact info at: ​http://goo.gl/Rmb9ff​ (Senate) and ​http://goo.gl/QY9CtQ (House). #strike301and302 
  • Students who attend diverse schools have better interpersonal skills and are more prepared for the workplace later in life. Call Congress and tell them #itstime to #strike301and302 from FY2019 appropriations bills. Find a helpful fact sheet at http://goo.gl/Pt3oDa​. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

June 8, 2018

(ED FUNDING, SCHOOL SAFETY) Permanent link

New Federal Money for School Safety—Apply by July 23!

Superintendents are likely aware that after the tragedy at Parkland, Congress acted quickly to create a new funding stream to support efforts to deter school violence. The passage of the STOP School Violence Act was supported by many organizations (including AASA) and was a bipartisan achievement. It authorizes $75 million in funding for FY18 and $100m in funding for the following 9 years.

The STOP Act dollars are distributed by the Department of Justice and within the DOJ there are 3 separate grant applications for districts. While the grant solicitation indicates that STOP Act grantees are considered local governments, a school district can file directly (not as a subgrantee) since districts levy taxes and are considered a form of local government by DOJ. When you start to fill out the application you should select "independent school district" and put in all the correct information.  

The deadline to apply is July 23. Click here to register to apply.  This is very fast because the dollars must go out the door to districts by September 30th. Obviously, given that many schools are out of session this is particularly inconvenient timing but AASA is hosting a webinar featuring Sandy Hook Promise that will explain the ins and outs of the grant process for district leaders. Register here for our free webinar on June 21st from 4-5 pm ET. 

Here’s the information you need on the first two grant opportunities that are distributed through the Department of Justice’s Bureau of Justice Assistance (BJA) division. The first grant is for School Violence Threat Assessment and Technology Reporting. The second grant is for School Violence Prevention and Mental Health Training Programs.

BJA STOP School Violence Threat Assessment and Technology Reporting Program 

(To view table on smartphone click here)

 

Eligible Applicants

States, Units of Local Government, and Federally-Recognized Indian Tribes

 

Note: BJA welcomes applicants with two or more entities, but only one may be the applicant.  Any others may be proposed subgrantees.

Geographic Distribution of Funding

  1. Category 1- State with Population Greater Than 5M (up to $1M for 4 awards)
  2. Category 2- State with Population of less than 5M (up to $500K for 6 awards)
  3. Category 3- Urban Are a/Large County with population greater than 500K (up to $500K for 14 awards)
  4. Category 4- Suburban area/medium-sized county with population between 100-500K (up to $250K for 12 awards)
  5. Category 5- Rural Area/Small County with population less than 100K (up to $150K for 11 awards)
  6. Category 6- Federally Recognized Indian Tribe (up to $100K for 5 awards)
  7. Category 7- Technology & Anonymous Reporting- No Population Requirement (up to $200K for 10 awards)

 

Totaling $21,150,000 for everything

To Apply

  1. Register on Grants.gov: https://www.grants.gov/web/grants/register.html by 11:59PM EST on July 23, 2018
 

Eligible Solicitation Funding

SOLICITATION LIMITS ALLOWABLE USES TO:

  • Development & operation of school threat assessment and crisis intervention teams

-School Threat Assessment:  note this can include threat assessment for individuals, security surveys, crime prevention through environmental design training and implementation, and target hardening prevention programs with the intention to limit access to school property to prevent acts of school violence

-Crisis Intervention Teams: can include coordination with law enforcement, school officials and possibly other disciplines from the community

  • Development of technology for local or regional anonymous reporting systems

-Can Also include: apps to assist school personnel and students during an active shooter incident, to include notification and sharing information with first responders

 

*Note there is a separate solicitation for training of school personnel and students, to include specialized training for school officials in responding to related mental health crises

Evidence-Based Requirement

 

demonstrates a statistically significant effect on relevant outcomes based on: o strong evidence from not less than one well-designed and well-implemented experimental study;

o moderate evidence from not less than one well-designed and well-implemented quasi-experimental study; or

o promising evidence from not less than one well-designed and well-implemented correlational study with statistical controls for selection bias;

 

• is consistent with best practices for school security, including: o applicable standards for school security established by a federal or state government agency;

 

8 BJA-2018-14489

o findings and recommendations of public commissions and task forces established to make recommendations or set standards for school security; and is

o compliant with all applicable codes, including building and life safety codes;

How Long will the Grant Be For

36-month performance period, beginning October 1, 2018

Cost-Sharing or Matching

25% Matching Requirement- BUT IT CAN BE IN-KIND

Award Date

By September 30, 2018

 

BJA STOP School Violence Prevention and Mental Health Training Program

(To view table on smartphone click here)

 

Eligible Applicants

States, Units of Local Government, and Federally-Recognized Indian Tribes

 

Note: BJA welcomes applicants with two or more entities, but only one may be the applicant.  Any others may be proposed subgrantees.

Geographic Distribution of Funding

  1. Category 1- State with Population Greater Than 5M (up to $1M for 6 awards)
  2. Category 2- State with Population of less than 5M (up to $500K for 8 awards)
  3. Category 3- Urban Are a/Large County with population greater than 500K (up to $500K for 18 awards)
  4. Category 4- Suburban area/medium-sized county with population between 100-500K (up to $250K for 16 awards)
  5. Category 5- Rural Area/Small County with population less than 100K (up to $150K for 16 awards)
  6. Category 6- Federally Recognized Indian Tribe (up to $100K for 6 awards)

 

Totaling $26,000,000 for everything

To Apply

  1. Register on Grants.gov: https://www.grants.gov/web/grants/register.html by 11:59PM EST on July 23, 2018
 

Eligible Solicitation Funding

  1. This solicitation specifically seeks applications that address training school personnel and educating students to prevent student violence and
  2. training school officials in responding to related mental health crises

 

Applicants may focus on either (a) or (b) separately OR they may incorporate both. Applicants are encouraged to design their applications to meet their localized needs regarding the prevention of school violence and response(s) to related mental health crises. Applicants should develop a strong and compelling proposal that details how they will address improving staff/student violence prevention efforts and their response to related mental health concerns.

 

Details on Deliverables:

Deliverables:

  • Training sessions for teachers and school personnel designed to prevent student violence
  • Education sessions for students with the intent to prevent violence
  • Training sessions for school officials related to responding to related mental health crises that may precipitate violent attacks on school grounds
  • Documentation of all training and education sessions conducted under the award

Evidence-Based Requirement

 

demonstrates a statistically significant effect on relevant outcomes based on: o strong evidence from not less than one well-designed and well-implemented experimental study;

o moderate evidence from not less than one well-designed and well-implemented quasi-experimental study; or

o promising evidence from not less than one well-designed and well-implemented correlational study with statistical controls for selection bias;

 

• is consistent with best practices for school security, including: o applicable standards for school security established by a federal or state government agency;

 

8 BJA-2018-14489

o findings and recommendations of public commissions and task forces established to make recommendations or set standards for school security; and is

o compliant with all applicable codes, including building and life safety codes;

How Long will the Grant Be For

36-month performance period, beginning October 1, 2018

Cost-Sharing or Matching

25% Matching Requirement- BUT IT CAN BE IN-KIND

Award Date

By September 30, 2018

 

We will be doing more in the coming weeks to make sure districts are aware of how these dollars can be spent, best practices and evidence-based programs they should consider funding with these dollars, and how district can make the grant process as successful as possible. Apply for the grants here

June 8, 2018

(STUDENT DATA PRIVACY, ADVOCACY TOOLS, RESEARCH, PUBLICATIONS AND TOOLKITS) Permanent link

School Practitioner Student Data & Privacy Bootcamp

AASA, in coordination with our friends at Future of Privacy Forum, are pleased to offer a free, one-day bootcamp on all aspects of student data and privacy. While these discussions have been dominating at the state and local government level, they are now bubbling up at the federal level, and this bootcamp is a one-stop shop for a quick crash course and learning about what good federal student data and privacy policy may look like, what we can learn from the work and experience of state policy, and more.

The bootcamp will be held on Monday July 9 (right before the AASA legislative advocacy conference) in Washington DC. A conference agenda is below. Interested? Email Noelle Ellerson Ng (nellerson@aasa.org).

Privacy Boot Camp Agenda: Monday, July 9  

  • 9:30 Welcome Comments
  • 9:35 Hypothetical
  • 10:05 FERPA, COPPA, and PPRA
    Reg Leichty, Foresight Law+Policy (moderator)
    Michael Hawes, Director of Student Privacy Policy, U.S. Department of Education
    Bret Cohen, Hogan Lovells
  • 11:15 Federal Legislation and State Laws
    Noelle Ellerson Ng, AASA
    Amelia Vance, Director of Education Privacy, Future of Privacy Forum
  • 12:15 Lunch
  • 1:15 Understanding Parent, Advocate, and Policy Concerns
    Susan Bearden, Consultant (moderator)
    Pris Regan, GMU
    Rachel Anderson, Data Quality Campaign
  • 2:15 Hypothetical
  • 2:45 Working with Ed Tech
    Chip Slavis, Alliance for Excellent Education (moderator)
    Sara Kloek, SIIA
    Jessica Geller Blackboard
    Dan Crowley, Quizlet
    Jena Draper, CatchOn
  • 4:00 Leading in Privacy: Best Practices from States and Districts
    Keith Krueger, CoSN (moderator)
    Melissa Tebbenkamp, Raytown Quality Schools
    Teddy Hartman, Howard County Public Schools, Maryland
    Steve Smith, Chief Information Officer, Cambridge Public Schools; Founder, Student Data Privacy Consortium
  • 5:15 Closing and Next Steps  

 

June 6, 2018

(WELL-BEING, ADVOCACY TOOLS, RESEARCH, PUBLICATIONS AND TOOLKITS, THE ADVOCATE) Permanent link

AASA Joins Five National Organizations in Joint Statement Before Federal School Safety Commission

AASA is pleased to be among the groups speaking before the Federal School Safety Commission in today's listening session, the first formal opportunity for school system leaders, professionals and stakeholders to engage in this process.

AASA submitted a statement with the Association of Educational Service Agencies, the Association of School Business Officials International, the Association of Latino Superintendents and Administrators, the National Rural Education Association and the National Rural Education Advocacy Consortium.

This listening session was first noticed on Friday, June 1. In the passing five days, we were able to conduct a quick survey of our members asking them to rank-order their priorities among the Commission's stated areas of conversation and discussion. That information is included in our statement.

Read the full statement.

 

June 5, 2018(1)

(ADVOCACY TOOLS, ED TECH) Permanent link

The Uphill Battle to Save Net Neutrality

On June 11, the regulatory protections referred to as 'Network Neutrality' will end. The regulations, put into place in February 2015 by President Obama's Federal Communications Commission (FCC) Chairman Tom Wheeler , classified broadband access as a telecommunications service, which meant it was subject to 'common carrier' provisions, which prohibit providers from discriminating in how broadband is used. The vote to rescind the regulations was led by President Trump's FCC Chairman, Ajit Pai.

AASA does not have a long history on net neutrality, and in fact much of our effort in this space is as much a reaction to Chairman Pai's changes to net neutrality as it is to the confluence of policies he has advanced that seem to demonstrate little understanding of or concern for ensuring that our nation's schools and the students they serve have equitable access to affordable connectivity. 

In his short tenure, the Chairman has advanced policies that run counter to or undermine programmatic changes designed to bolster and grow internet access, so that 24 hour learners could have 24 access.

  • E-Rate: In 2017, the Chairman released a notice of proposed rule making that would have started a conversation to rescind or reduce funding available to support the E-Rate program. Full details on the blog.
  • Lifeline: Lifeline is a sister program to E-Rate, and is a program that has historically helped low-income homes afford phone access. In 2014, the program was modernized to allow beneficiaries to use the program to choose to get broadband access. Internet access at home is an important element of addressing the homework gap, the reality where students are unable to do homework because they lack home access. Unfortunately, in 2017, Chairman Pai took steps that significantly limit the ability of internet providers--those willing to provide internet in these under-served or geographically isolated communities--to operate in this sphere, essentially bringing the important modernization to a halt. 
  • Net Neutrality: When it comes to net neutrality in the K12 setting, equitable access to broadband is critical element to promoting and growing educational equity and AASA is concerned that the FCC’s partisan vote to end network neutrality serves the exact opposite purpose, slowing or even growing broadband connectivity gaps. The network neutrality protections offer a strong complement to the E‐Rate equity focus, impacting access to not only affordable broadband access, but also the educational content, tools and access it provides to students and educators alike. EdWeek's Market Watch has a good explainer on the education angle of net neutrality.

Collectively, these changes represent not only a missed opportunity, but a threat, to ensuring continued equitable access to connectivity for students and schools. 

What can be done? There is momentum on the hill to reinstate the regulatory protections via legislation. AASA supported the Senate version of the bill--which was passed in May--to reinstate the protections. The vote now goes to the House. This is an admittedly uphill battle. While the general public broadly supports continuing the protections, it is a partisan issue on the Hill, with the GOP leading the effort to end the regulations. Speaker Ryan does not want to take this vote because he not only doesn't support it, but it would be a rough vote for his party to take going into mid-term elections when any press about opposing the protections would certainly translate into primary and general election campaign fodder. Even if we are able to force a House vote (low chance), and is passes the House (even lower chance!), it is all but certain President Trump would veto the bill, thereby ensuring the end of network neutrality during his tenure.

That said, it is a year of crazy firsts and unexpected things happening. To that end, if you find yourself reaching out to your Congressional delegation, make sure to tell your Representative that you support the continuation of the net neutrality protections and urge them to vote for the legislation to extend the protections. 

 

June 5, 2018

(ESEA, ADVOCACY TOOLS, ED FUNDING) Permanent link

National Title II Day of Action: June 7

 Join Educator Organizations at the National and State Level for a National Day of Action 
in Support of Title II Funding

Earlier this year, AASA was pleased to sign on to a letter supporting funding for Title II of the Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA), a program whose funds are in supporting our nation’s educators in meeting the needs of their students. ESSA provides new opportunities for states and districts to use Title II-A funds to attract, support and retain high-quality and diverse educators by providing significantly more time for planning and collaboration, job embedded professional development that is aligned to student and teacher needs, coaching and mentorship. Many states report that Title II-A funds make possible the majority of their professional development for educators. In addition, these funds can be used to support the educator workforce pipeline. Also, twenty-four states have committed to using the optional 3% set-aside in Title II-A to make strategic investments in school leaders

We need every voice, and AASA is proud to support this day of action.

Join us on June 7 for a National Day of Action to advocate for full funding for Title II, Part A (Title II) of the Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA). Nearly every district receives Title II funding to support the recruitment, preparation, development, and retention of excellent teachers and school leaders, but the funding for Title II is in danger of being eliminated. The elimination—or significant reduction—of Title II funding would have drastic and negative impacts on teachers, principals, school leaders, and the students they serve. 

Four Simple Ways to Advocate for Title II Funding on June 7

  1. Sign up for our Thunderclap :A Thunderclap is a social media tool to amplify a message. To participate in our Thunderclap, go to https://www.thunderclap.it/projects/70288-title-ii-a-day-of-action and use your Twitter or Facebook account to sign up. On June 7th at exactly 8:30 a.m. (ET), the tool will post an identical message in support of Title II funding to all the supporters’ accounts, amplifying our message to all of their followers and friends.
  2. Send a  letter to Congress: Contact your Congressional delegation. Need the name and email address of the education staffer in your Representative or Senators' office? Email Noelle or Leslie. Have your letter focus on  the importance of Title II, and its importance in providing professional development for educators. Below is a draft letter you use for reference:

    Dear ____,
    I am writing as a constituent, as a leader in my school, and as a leader in my community to strongly urge you to provide full funding for the Title II, Part A program in FY 2019. As an educator, I was encouraged when Congress passed the bipartisan Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA) in 2015. ESSA provided new opportunities for schools to invest in our nation’s teachers, principals and other school leaders.

    Recently, though, I have become alarmed by the very real prospect that Congress will not provide any funding at all for Title II in FY 2019. President Trump’s proposed FY 2019 budget would eliminate all funding for the program. This is dangerously shortsighted because it would severely disrupt many states’ ESSA implementation plans and hamper our efforts to increase student achievement.

    Tile II, Part A provides critical funding to states for the purposes of preparing, training, recruiting, and retaining high-quality teachers, principals, assistant principals, and other school leaders. These groups all play a critical in ensuring that our nation's students have a high-quality learning experience through high school in order to be college and career ready. To aid students effectively, teachers, principals and other school leaders must be afforded the necessary opportunities for professional learning and growth as they work to improve teaching and learning in all schools.

    While I am extremely disheartened by President Trump's proposal, there is still a chance for Congress to reverse course and fully restore funding for Title II, Part A at its ESSA authorized level of $2.295 billion in FY 2019.  Thank you for your consideration, and for your support of our nation's educators and students.

    Sincerely, [Educator’s name]

  3. Call your members in Congress: Unsure who your representative is? Visit the Find Your Representative tool. Unsure what to say? Here is a script you can use when speaking to a staff member of the office.

    -  I am extremely concerned that President Trump sought to eliminate funding for Title II, Part A in his FY 2019 budget because this will severely disrupt many states’ ESSA implementation plans and hamper educator’s efforts to increase student achievement.
    -  I urge Senator/Representative [insert name] to restore Title II, Part A funding to its ESSA authorized level of $2.295 billion in FY 2019.
    - Given the unique role that principals and teachers play in ensuring that our nation's students have high-quality learning experiences in order to be college and career ready, educators must be afforded the necessary opportunities for professional learning and growth as they work to improve teaching and learning in all schools.
    - I am a [insert title and organizational affiliation] and I am calling to urge Senator/Representative [insert name here] to restore cuts made to Title II, Part A of the Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA). Title II, Part A provides critical funding to states for the purposes of preparing, training, recruiting, and retaining high-quality teachers, principals, assistant principals, and other school leaders.

  4. Tweet using #TitleIIA @[Senators and Reps]: Here are some sample tweets you can use:

    #TitleIIA is critical for teachers, school leaders, and principals to do their jobs effectively; cuts threaten this ability.

    Millions of teachers, principals, and school leaders depend on #TitleIIA to improve schools and instruction in the classroom.

    #ESSA allows states to use 3% of #TitleIIA funds for PD for principals; cutting decreases the chances to seize this opportunity.

    Each #ESSA plan is relying on #TitleIIA dollars to implement programs that will train educators on how to improve student achievement. Congress, give the states what they want by supporting full funding for #TitleIIA!

    The quality of teaching and leadership in schools are the two most significant in-school factors tied to student achievement. #TitleIIA

    #TitleIIA supports increased student academic achievement by promoting strategies that will positively affect educator effectiveness.

    Educators and students deserve schools led by great principals. Tell Congress to maintain school leadership funding through #TitleIIA

    Educators and students deserve schools filled with outstanding teachers. Tell Congress to maintain professional development funding for teachers through #TitleIIA

    Students and teachers need great principals to thrive—Tell Congress: Don't cut school leadership funding! #TitleIIA

    Without great principals, we won't have great schools. Tell Congress to maintain school leadership funding! #TitleIIA

    Educators: Join us in telling Congress not to cut school leadership funding! #TitleIIA

We hope you can join us on June 7th to support our nation’s teachers, principals and other school leaders!