Second AASA COVID-19 Survey

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Second AASA COVID-19 Survey

As part of our ongoing advocacy efforts specific to the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic, AASA has released the second iteration of our nationwide survey, which will provide data that better illustrates the impact of COVID-19 in schools in terms of the effect of the pandemic itself and the resulting economic downturn.
 
The data from this survey will be used to track how districts are responding to federal and state pressures to re-open schools and deliver equity-based services during the crisis. Moreover, the survey will help detail the fiscal impact of COVID-19 on our nation's public schools.
 
AASA's last COVID-19 survey received more than 1,600 responses from 48 states and produced valuable data that has been integral in our advocacy efforts on IDEA, the homework gap, and the federal Coronavirus emergency relief legislative packages. However, we could not have achieved these results without your help. To help us continue elevating the voice of superintendents on Capitol Hill, please take a few moments to complete the survey by clicking here.


 Thank you in advance, and if you have questions, then please email Chris Rogers (crogers@aasa.org).

Guest Post: Providing Equitable Services to Students and Teachers in Non-Public Schools under CARES Act Programs

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Guest Post: Providing Equitable Services to Students and Teachers in Non-Public Schools under CARES Act Programs

The U.S. Department of Education released Providing Equitable Services to Students and Teachers in Non-Public Schools under CARES Act Programs.  

The purpose of this document is to provide information about equitable services for students and teachers in non-public schools under the Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security Act (CARES Act), Public Law 116-136, 134 Stat. 281 (March 27, 2020).

Two programs in the CARES Act Education Stabilization Fund require a local educational agency (LEA) that receives funds to provide equitable services to students and teachers in non-public schools: 

The Governor’s Emergency Education Relief Fund (GEER Fund) totaling $2,953,230,000 (Section 18002 of the CARES Act). 

The Elementary and Secondary School Emergency Relief Fund (ESSER Fund) totaling $13,229,265,000 (Section 18003 of the CARES Act). 

Providing Equitable Services to Students and Teachers in Non-Public Schools under CARES Act Programs Frequently Asked Questions can be found here on the GEER Fund website and here on the ESSER Fund website.  Please note they are the same FAQs for both programs.

The Department will provide additional or updated information as necessary on the Department’s COVID-19 webpage.

 

Best,

The Nat’l Engagement TeamU.S. Department of Education (ED)

Guest Blog Post: The Impact of the COVID-19 Recession on Teaching Positions

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Guest Blog Post: The Impact of the COVID-19 Recession on Teaching Positions

On Thursday, April 30 LPI blog posted today with projections of the likely impact of COVID on the elimination of teaching positions. The blog includes state-level information and different projections based on the percentage of funding cuts. We know these cuts will fall hardest on low-wealth school districts and students of color. Cuts to “teaching positions” also encompasses other positions such as social workers, school psychologists, and guidance counselors which are even more critical at this time. The blog calls for additional significant federal investments to prevent this loss over the next 1-2 years. 

Click the link above to read the full post. 

AASA Leads Letter to CMS Asking for Medicaid Reimbursement Flexibility

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AASA Leads Letter to CMS Asking for Medicaid Reimbursement Flexibility

 Today, AASA along with 18 other national health and education organizations, sent a letter to the Centers for Medicaid and Medicare asking  that CMS issue further guidance to States that would enable greater flexibility and efficiency in the delivery of healthcare services, particularly mental health services, to children during this crisis. The letter can be found here.

 

We believe that the ability of providers and districts to respond to the current health crisis and provide essential services would be greatly enhanced by allowing and encouraging States to utilize a cost-based rather than an encounter-based approach to claiming and reimbursement. When schools do re-open, students will enter classrooms with more serious health conditions and multiple, unaddressed health needs that will impede learning. Providers, in turn, will face even larger caseloads and have less time to spend on administrative paperwork.

 

In particular, this flexibility would enable districts of all sizes to effectively respond to the COVID-19 crisis while ensuring they have the resources needed to provide these critical health services to students.