Reader Reply

School Administrator, September 2015 
 


Too often, career and technical education has been thought of as an add-on feature to an otherwise stand-alone curriculum. I was thrilled, therefore, to see School Administrator’s April 2015 issue acknowledge CTE’s integral role in increasing student engagement and achievement.

CTE isn't just about getting students into a job. It is about laying the foundation they need as lifelong learners to achieve their goals — whether they are heading to a two- or four-year college degree, an industry-recognized certification or other training or credentials. And as Chaney Mosely noted in his article (“Career and College Ready”), CTE educators are often the ones leading the way with new approaches such as career academies.

I hope that such attention to a readership of school district leaders can help us share the importance of recognizing CTE professionals as partners in K-12 education who stand ready to prepare every student for college and career success.

LEANN WILSON
EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR,
ASSOCIATION FOR CAREER AND TECHNICAL EDUCATION,
Alexandria, Va.

 

Pioneer Women

In your 150th anniversary issue (February 2015), I paid special attention to the article on diversity by Glenn Cook. I was one of the 75 women selected to participate in the 1977 Ford Foundation grant that he references. Until her death, AASA administrator Effie Jones kept tabs on each of us, but I have lost track of most of the other women in the cohort.

I am wondering whether AASA has any information regarding the careers of these women? I went on to become a superintendent in the Kelso School District in Washington. Upon retirement from that position, I began a second career teaching and coordinating leadership programs for Washington State University.

GAY V. SELBY
EDUCATIONAL LEADERSHIP PROGRAM CHAIR,
WASHINGTON STATE UNIVERSITY,
VANCOUVER, WASH.

  

Fractal Leadership

In reading Mark Edwards’ article, “Second-Order Leadership” (May 2015), I was particularly impressed by his reference to fractal leadership as a desired model. I wrote a paper about 15 years ago on the importance of incorporating a “new sciences” view as organizational leaders. Since that time, it has been rare to find leaders who are aware of these concepts.

I appreciate Edwards for advancing the idea that connectedness and self-similarity are foundational leadership concepts in this new era. He has a like-minded thinker on the West Coast who is attempting to do similar work.

DEVIN VODICKA
SUPERINTENDENT,
VISTA UNIFIED SCHOOL DISTRICT,
Vista, Calif.

 

Any Ideas?

The staff at School Administrator is planning the magazine’s spring issues, and we’d welcome our readers’ ideas on what we ought to address. If you’ve read a good book or heard a presentation relating to one of the upcoming editorial themes, give us a heads-up. And if you are eager to propose your own story for us, please do so.

The spring themes are these:

  • March: the productivity of rural education
  • April: intelligence and grit, social and emotional learning
  • May: combating poverty through schooling
  • June: leadership succession

Please send your thinking to magazine@aasa.org.



 

Letters should be addressed to: Editor, School Administrator, 1615 Duke St., Alexandria, VA 22314.
Fax: 703-841-1543. E-mail: magazine@aasa.org