AASA and NSBA Launch Childhood Asthma Guide

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE 

Contact:

Kitty Porterfield, AASA, 703-774-6953, kporterfield@aasa.org
Linda Embrey, NSBA, 703-838-6737, lembrey@nsba.org

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Leading education groups develop In the Schoolyard and Beyond: Addressing Childhood Asthma in Your Community guide to provide a consistent and supportive environment for children with asthma

Arlington, Va., March 29, 2011. The American Association of School Administrators (AASA) and the National School Boards Association (NSBA) have released a guide for families, youth-serving organizations, and schools leaders on steps each can take to provide a consistent and supportive environment for children with asthma. In the Schoolyard and Beyond: Addressing Childhood Asthma in Your Community was developed under a cooperative agreement with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention/Division of Adolescent and School Health. The hard copy publication is available in both English and Spanish and is also downloadable for distribution from both NSBA (www.nsba.org) and AASA (www.aasa.org).

More than five million children ages 5-17 suffer from asthma,(1) which can be life-threatening if not properly managed. Nearly 13 million school days are missed each year by students with asthma.(2)

“It is important that schools, families, youth-serving organizations, and health care providers work together to improve the lives of children with asthma,” said AASA Executive Director Daniel Domenech. “School system leaders can play a pivotal role in students’ asthma management by creating policies and practices that ensure asthma-friendly school, after-school, and home environments and by communicating with parents and youth-serving organizations about students’ health needs.”

In the Schoolyard and Beyond: Addressing Childhood Asthma in Your Community centers on six actions that demonstrate how families, youth-serving organizations, and schools maintain asthma-friendly environments:

1. Use Asthma Action Plans
2. Reduce Asthma Triggers
3. Manage Medications and Help Children Master the Correct Way to Use Them
4. Encourage Opportunities for Physical Activity
5. Establish and Maintain Good Communication
6. Provide and/or Take Advantage of Asthma Education

“School board members and administrators understand that school leaders play an important role to provide support for young people with asthma,” said Anne L. Bryant, Executive Director of NSBA. “NSBA is pleased to partner with AASA on this important project.” 

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About AASA
The American Association of School Administrators, founded in 1865, is the professional organization for more than 13,000 educational leaders across America and in many other countries. AASA advocates for the highest quality public education for all students, and develops and supports school system leaders.

Online: www.aasa.org.
Twitter: www.twitter.com/AASAHQ
Facebook: www.facebook.com/AASApage

About NSBA
Founded in 1940, the National School Boards Association (NSBA) is a not-for-profit organization representing state associations of school boards and their more than 90,000 local school board members throughout the U.S. Working with and through our state associations, NSBA advocates for equity and excellence in public education through school board leadership.

Online: www.nsba.org
Twitter: www.twitter.com/NSBAComm
Facebook: www.facebook.com/SchoolBoards

This document was developed under a cooperative agreement with the Division of Adolescent and School Health of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention grant number U58/DP 000398-04. Its contents are solely the responsibility of the authors and do not necessarily represent the official views of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

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[1] Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Health Statistics National Health Interview Survey, 1999-2008.

[2] Akinbami, L. “Asthma Prevalence, Health Care Use and Mortality: United States 2003-05.” Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Health Statistics, 2006.