Book Review

Career Intelligence: The 12 New Rules for Work and Life SuccessCurriculum


Reviewed by Brian L. Benzel,
chief operating officer,
Seattle Public Schools, Seattle, Wash.

 

In Career Intelligence: The 12 New Rules for Work and Life Success, author Barbara Moses provides guidance for maximizing the human potential within the school system and informs our thinking about the design of educational programs for young people.

She devotes the opening segment of her work to a frank outline of "the new landscape" and how the strengths and interests of various generations of people can best be used. For example, the values and interests of what she calls a "pre-boomer"(anyone born prior to 1945) differs from the "post-boomer" (a person born between 1967 and 1975).

Career Intelligence outlines 12 new rules we can use to become "career activists." Awareness of these rules provides valuable guidance for leaders seeking to align practice with the values and aspirations of their organizations.

These rules also give guidance about the preparation young people need as they prepare to enter the work force. Moses describes how leaders can build organizational capacity and prepare the next generation to properly manage their freedoms and responsibilities. Balancing the needs of younger workers with the wisdom and perspective of more senior staff is essential. She makes a powerful case for building a role for mentors and career coaches into the organization.

(Career Intelligence: The 12 New Rules for Work and Life Success, by Barbara Moses, Berrett-Koehler Publishers, San Francisco, Calif., 1998, 283 pp. with index, $15.95 softcover)

outlines 12 new rules we can use to become "career activists." Awareness of these rules provides valuable guidance for leaders seeking to align practice with the values and aspirations of their organizations.These rules also give guidance about the preparation young people need as they prepare to enter the work force. Moses describes how leaders can build organizational capacity and prepare the next generation to properly manage their freedoms and responsibilities. Balancing the needs of younger workers with the wisdom and perspective of more senior staff is essential. She makes a powerful case for building a role for mentors and career coaches into the organization.( by Barbara Moses, Berrett-Koehler Publishers, San Francisco, Calif., 1998, 283 pp. with index, $15.95 softcover)